VMstore performance

View trends

IOPS

12,736 IOPS

1,269 - 19,073

 

Throughput

321 MBps

57 - 659

 

Latency

1.0 ms

7.5 ms

Flash hit ratio

100 %


Performance Reserves

49% free

auto allocated
free
51% used

Physical Space

9.7 TiB free

other
live data
snapshots
free
284.2 GB used (10%)
3.6 TIB Logical (10.2x space savings)

Protection

0 MB replicated a day

Performance reserves changers

SWDev_2 26.4% 26.4
MySQL VM0.6% -9.4
Test_411.2%   9.3
RHEV_VM0.8%  -5.9
OpenStack VM16.1%  -4.5
HyperV VM30.6%  -3.9
HyperV VM40.2%  -2.8
XenServer VM11.5% 1.5
Eng Desktop_NewHire6.3% -0.9
Sales Desktop_NewHire0.6%  0.6

Space Changers

HyperV VM30.2 GB 0.2
SWDev_2 57.5 GB 5.0
Test_40.2 GB 0.2
RHEV_VM0.2 GB 0.2
XenServer VM10.2 GB 0.2
MySQL VM0.2 GB 0.2
OpenStack VM10.2 GB  0.2
HyperV VM457.5 GB 5.0
Eng Desktop_NewHire0.2 GB 0.6
Stats at 01:55 pm | Refresh
Service Groups
VM Replication State IOPS MBps Latency ms Provisioned GiB Used GiB Change MB/day High frequency snapshots
SWDev_2 Replica up to date
7,807
84.6
1.4
53
24.9
1,555 disabled
MySQL VM Replica up to date
0
0.0
0.0
36
0.0
0 disabled
Test_4 Replica up to date
0
0.0
0.0
26
0 disabled
RHEV_VM Replica up to date
0
0.0
0.0
29
0.3
0 disabled
OpenStack VM1 not configured
0
0.0
0.0
50
0.4
0 disabled
HyperV VM3 not configured
0
0.0
0.0
50
0 disabled
HyperV VM4 not configured
0
0.0
0.0
50
0 disabled
XenServer VM1 not configured
0
0.0
0.0
50
0 disabled
Eng Desktop_NewHire not configured
4
0.1
1.3
108
0 disabled
Sales Desktop_NewHire not configured
0
0.0
0.0
51
0 disabled
1 to 28 | 77 Total    | Show graphs
Virtual Disk content
Snapshots


The power of VM-aware storage to simplify file and VM-level restore is a consistent crowd pleaser. Check it out yourself.

Mission: Restore an unstable VM, and then a missing file.

Action: To get started, we’ll need to drill into individual VMs. Click on the virtual machines tab in the top left corner.

Here are all the VMs on your Tintri VMstore. You’ve received a call that Test_4 is unstable and needs to be restored.

Action: No problem, just click on Test_4.

Action: So far so good. Now select “Restore VM/files”.

Action: You have a choice to restore VM or Guest OS file. Make sure you’ve selected VM in the dialog box. And then in the dropdown, let’s revert to a stable instance of this VM from Wednesday, April 6th at 2:30AM.

Great, just hit “Restore” and you have restored the unstable Test_4 from a previous VM-level snapshot in a few clicks.

You’ve completed a VM-level restore. And oh, Tintri has retained ALL your performance history and snapshots.

But what about a file-level restore?

Action: It just so happens someone mistakenly deleted a key file from HyperV_VM3. No problem, just click on the VM.

Action: That's it. And again select "Restore VM/files."

Action: Looks familiar, right? Except this time select the “Guest OS file” radio button in the dialog box.

Action: Perfect, now in the dropdown select the most recent snapshot from Monday, April 11 at 7:05AM.

Now you just need to Restore the Guest OS to a previous snapshot and then pop into Disk Management (from within the Guest OS) to bring the restored snapshot online and perform the file restore.

Action: And then hit Restore. Almost there.